All posts by Kevin

Don’t Avoid Tough Decisions

Don't pray for an easy life quote Bruce LeeIf you have any management or leadership responsibility then you will inevitably have tough situations to deal with, and tough decisions to make.

The last thing you should do is to avoid them … because they just don’t go away, in fact they typically just get worse.

You will inevitably have lots of other tasks, responsibilities and commitments where you could spend your time … but that ugly situation is just going to fester.

You can procrastinate and try to avoid … but it will still be there, and not only is it likely to be causing you problems but other people too.

When you avoid those tough situations you undermine your own credibility, create problems for those around you … and still you are going to have to deal with it at some point.

I prefer to adopt the “rip a band aid off” approach.  Just get it over with!!!!

It is amazing, but nine times out of ten as soon as it is handled, no matter how painful that might be, there is a sense of relief that it is off your plate!

“Much of the stress that people feel doesn’t come from having too much to do. It comes from not finishing what they’ve started.”  David Allen
Kevin Dee is the founder and Chairman of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Board!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) Virtual Recruiter service?


February Tech News

Tech News HeaderThis is my 30,000 foot look at events in the Tech industry for February 2018. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of previous year’s Februarys …

Five years ago in February 2013 Dell went private in a $24.4 billion deal that included a $2 billion investment by Microsoft.  Oracle paid $1.7 billion for networking company Acme Packet Inc.; Rackspace bought big data company ObjectRocket; Telus was busy with two acquisitions, electronic medical records division of the Canadian Medical Association and digital forensics company Digital Wyzdom; HP also sold the Palm operating system to Facebook logoLG for their smart TVs.  February 2014 was busy in M&A. Facebook make a big move with the $16 billion acquisition of Whatsapp.  Comcast made a $45 billion play for Time Warner Cable and regulatory approval or otherwise is imminent; Oracle paid a reputed $400 million for data management platform company Bluekai; LinkedIn paid $120 million for online job search company Bright; and Klout was bought for about $100 million by Lithium Technologies.  Google made a couple of acquisitions, online fraud company and secure logon company Slicklogin.  IBM bought database as a service company Cloudant; and Monster bought a couple of companies, social profile company Talentbin and job aggregation and distribution technology company Gozaic. Finally, Microsoft announced Steve Balmer’s retirement and appointed a new CEO, Satya Nadella. Three years ago February 2015 saw some interesting activity.  The $6.3 billion merger of Staples and Office Depot and the $1.6 Billion purchase of Orbitz by Expedia are two examples of sectors experiencing massive consolidation.  There was a big buy in the communications and IT space with Harris paying $4,75 billion for Excelis to establish a 23,000 person company.  There was a big data center play with UK based Telecity Group paying $2.2 billion for Microsoft logoInterxion Holdings.  Microsoft made a couple of acquisitions, paying $200 million for pen-tech maker N-Trig and $100 million for mobile calendar company Sunrise.  Samsung bought a mobile payment company (competing with Apple pay), LoopPay.  Also out buying was Twitter which picked up Niche, a network of social media creators.  There were a number of interesting deals in Asia, including Sapdeal buying luxury fashion estore Exclusively; Foodpanda made six acquisitions of online meal delivery services to establish itself as a powerhouse in that space.  Australian job board OneShift bought Adage, which is a job board serving people over 45.  In February 2016 the biggest deal saw HNA Group of Cisco logoChina pay $6 billion for Ingram Micro.  Two other billion dollar deals included Cisco paying $1.4 billion for IoT company, Jasper Technologies and a consortium of Chinese internet firms making a $1.2 billion bid for Opera. Microsoft was busy with a couple of acquisitions, Xamarin a cross platform mobile application development company, and Swiftkey which produces predictive keyboard technology.  Another busy company was Alibaba Group which was investing in a bunch of companies, including a $100 million investment in Groupon, and smaller investments in microblogging site Weibo; software company Momo; augmented reality startup Magic Leap; Chinese retail chain Suning; and Singapore telco SingPost.  Other companies of note out buying included IBM who bought digital agency Aperto and Blackberry acquired cybersecurity company Encription.  Last year February 2017 saw very little M&A action.  Nokia paid $371 million for Finnish telecom software company Comptel, as it reinvents itself, and Apple picked up an AI startup company RealFace.    Another company in the news, but for the wrong reasons was Samsung which is in the middle of a significant bribery scandal.

Which brings us back to the present …

February 2018 was a very active month in M&A, with lots of deals.  The biggest saw more consolidation in the telco space with US based GTT paying $2.3 billion for London headquartered Interroute, thus expanding its global footprint.  Security companies were a theme in this month’s acquisitions and you will spot several in the following list.  Cybersecurity firm Phishme was bought with $400 million of private equity money; Splunk paid $350 million for Phantom Cyber Corp; and Proofpoint paid $225 million for Wombat Security Technologies.  Other deals saw LogMeIn pay $342 million for Jive Communications; Carbonite pay $146 million for Mozy; and  Red Hat pay $250 million for Core OS.  Some of the household names that were also out making deals included Oracle, Google, Opentext, Avaya and Citrix.  All in all the busiest M&A month I have seen in a while.

Samsung was in the news for passing Intel in size within the chip manufacturing market for the first time, which is much more positive press than the scandal of a year ago.  The fourth quarter of 2017 saw the first decrease in smartphone sales since 2004.  It is suggested that cybercrime is now costing $600 billion annually which is up about a third in the last three years.

The Canadian market took a hit in January, losing 80,000 jobs (50,000 in Ontario).  The stark difference in tax treatment between the Canadian budget and the US tax reform moves, together with NAFTA negotiations are causing some concern in Canada.  The US however continues to enjoy continuing job growth and almost every indicator is positive. Around the world most countries are enjoying job growth and positive indicators.  One exception to all that positivity is in the UK where the uncertainly around the Brexit seems to be having an impact.

That is it for my monthly look at what was happening in the technology space over the last month, compared to the same month in previous years.  I’ll be back in about a month’s time, until then … walk fast and smile! ——————————————————————————————————————————
Kevin Dee is the founder and Chairman of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Board!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) Virtual Recruiter service?

January Tech News

Tech News HeaderThis is my 30,000 foot look at events in the Tech industry for January 2018. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of previous year’s Januarys

Five years ago, in January 2013 Cisco bought mobile network software company Intucell for $475 million and sold its Linksys division to Belkin.  The biggest dollar value deal was AT&T’s purchase of some of Verison Wireless’s airwaves for $1.9 Billion.  Other deals saw NCR buy video software ASTM company uGenius Technology; Canon Canada acquired long-time partner and document management company Oce Canada; NetSuite bought retail management systems company Retail Anywhere; and AVI-SPL bought Duocom-Duologik.  January 2014 was an interesting month with a few big M&A deals.  Google was an especially busy player, selling its Motorola Mobility handset unit to Lenovo for $2.9 billion but paying $3.2 billion for Nest Labs and the company also bought Bitspin.  The other big deal saw VMware pay $1.17 billion for mobile device management company AirWatch.  Other big names on the acquisition trail included Oracle who bought cloud based service delivery company Corente; Microsoft paid a reputed $100 million for cloud based service company (seems to be a theme) Parature; Ricoh purchased IT service company Mindshift from BestBuy; and Hootsuite bought analytics company uberVu. Three Yahoo logoyears ago in January 2015, the biggest deal was Hutchison offering more than $14 billion for O2. Other big dollar news saw Yahoo looking like it might be remaking itself, spinning off its $40 Billion stake in Alibaba to become smaller, leaner and either buy or be bought!  The final M&A activity involving a “B” was Telco equipment company Commscope offering $3 billion for TE Connectivities network business.  There were also a number of very well-known companies out buying, and in no particular order … Amazon paid something like $300 million (approximate) for chip designer Annapurna Labs; Expedia bought its online travel competitor Travelocity for $200 million; Samsung paid $100 million for Brazil’s largest print company Simpress; Google paid about $100 million for mobile payments company Softcard; Facebook bought a company that has a Siri like solution that can be embedded in other products; Dropbox bought CloudOn a document editing and productivity tools company; Twitter paid somewhere between $30 million and $40 million for Zipdial, an Indian company that does some funky marketing thing with phone hang ups; and finally Microsoft made two acquisitions, startup text analytics company Equivo and in a departure from its history it bought open software company Revolution Analytics. There were no huge deals in IBM logoJanuary 2016, but there was plenty of activity with some of the household names out shopping.  IBM bought video service provider Ustream; Microsoft bought game form learning tool MinecraftEdu; Apple bought “emotion recognition” company Emotient; and Oracle bought media web tracking firm AddThis.  Toshiba bought an ERP solutions company Ignify, and a number of smaller deals included Juniper Networks buying BTISystems Inc.; FireEye bought iSight partners; Acceo Solutions bought Groupe Techna and SmartPrint bought LaserCorp’s Toronto based managed print services business.  Last Cisco logoyear, in  January 2017 the multi-billion-dollar deal of the month was Cisco’s purchase of app performance management company, AppDynamics for $3.7 billion. HP Enterprise purchased data center hardware provider, SimpliVity for $650 million. Microsoft acquired Montreal-based deep learning start-up Maluuba for an undisclosed sum. Google announced plans to purchase Twitter’s mobile developer platform Fabric. Trello, the startup behind a leading task-management app was purchased by Atlassian for $425 million. CRM giant, Salesforce bought Unity&Variety to enhance its productivity app service Quip Managed Service Provider of data and database administration, Datavail, acquired Canadian IT channel leader Navantis.

Which brings us back to the present…

Amazon logoJanuary 2018 saw the continuing saga of cities bidding to win Amazon’s second headquarters, now down to 20 finalists.  The Meltdown and Spectre hardware bugs are causing major headaches for tech companies and their clients, with the potential for hackers to take advantage.

On the M&A front the big deal saw investment management software company SS&C pay $5.4 billion for financial services software company DST Systems.  Amazon Web Services increased its cybersecurity protection capabilities through the purchase of Sqrrl.  ADP bought gig economy tool WorkMarket and TD Bank bought a Canadian AI company Layer 6.

The economy is getting “interesting”.  After some good indicators in 2017 Canada lost 88,000 jobs in January.  It is likely that new labor legislation introducing tougher labor laws and increased minimum wages in Ontario and Alberta were factors.  The US numbers are still looking good adding another 234,000 jobs in January, Global CEO confidence is up and indicators around the world still seem positive.  A stock market correction in mid-January is however causing some concern.

That has been my look at the tech news for January … until next month, Walk Fast and Smile!
Kevin Dee is the founder and Chairman of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Board!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) Virtual Recruiter service?

Canada’s Job Market – Fourth Quarter of 2017

Canadian Job MarketGeneral Observations:

The unemployment rate at the end December was 5.7%.  This was the lowest rate in forty (40) years, and a significant improvement over September when it was 6.2%.  During the previous 12 months, Canada added a very strong 422,500 jobs of which 394,200 were permanent full time jobs.

As just one indicator of the markets, and for the purposes of this report I focus on the TSX which showed strong growth during Q4, ending with a reading of 16,200 which was an improvement of 600 points from the end of Q3.

The price of a barrel of oil saw a little resurgence in the final quarter of 2017 reaching heights it hadn’t seen for a few years now.  It remains to be seen whether a price near the $65 range is sustainable, or the result of some OPEC activity but some companies are reacting positively.

The Canadian dollar continued to operate in the 80c US range, which was very similar to Q3.  This was positive given how well the US economy has been performing.

The Canadian Staffing Index is an indicator of the strength of the largest provider of talent in any economy (the staffing industry) and an excellent barometer of the health of Canada’s economy. The reading latest reading Q4 was close to its high, at 123.  This was a big jump from its Q3 reading of 109 and a reading of 116 in Q4 of last year.

Eagle logoHere at Eagle, demand was about as expected in Q4 which includes the holiday season.  Client demand dipped about 15% and was very similar to demand in Q4 of last year.  The number of job applicants was up more than 20% from Q4 of a year ago, and very similar to last quarter when we would have expected a seasonal dip.

Some of the sectors with big talent demands.

Piggy Bank accepting moneyThe financial sector is a huge employer in Canada and top talent is always in demand.  Technology is a huge part of their ecosystem and they invest in leading-edge technologies to gain competitive advantage and to improve productivity.  The banks have been leaders in automation (ATMs etc) and invest in AI, technology incubators and all of the latest innovations.  There will continue to be a demand in their technology shops into the foreseeable future.

Like the banks, the telcos are big believers in technology and invest heavily.  They have large technology groups and are always looking for ways to differentiate and gain competitive advantage through the use of technology.  While they demand the best talent in order to compete, they are also careful about keeping employment costs under control, particularly as they are also acquisitive, which can mean a big focus on integration of acquired companies.  Some of the drivers of demand here include the highly competitive nature of the business, investment in infrastructure, technological innovation and a need to plan for a retiring “Boomer” workforce.

The US economy continues to add jobs, and with the recently introduced tax changes we can anticipate more investment and an even bigger appetite for talent.  The demand for skills in the US coupled with Canada’s increased tax burden will ensure that Canadian talent continues to head South.

ConstructionThe construction industry continues to thrive in Canada, and presents a good career opportunity.  The never-ending demand from the big projects (look at the skyline in just about any city), coupled with the demand for home renovation projects will ensure this demand continues for some time yet.  The aging workforce will also present opportunities, as workers retire.

The three levels of government in Canada are big employers, employing more than 20% of Canada’s workforce (CFIB).  These are well-paying jobs with great benefits, and with the retiring baby boomer generation comes a continuing need for talent.

More Specifically:

cn towerThere are more than six (6) million people living in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and it is home to more than 50% of Canadian head offices. It is the 4th largest city in North America, and represents about 60% of Eagle’s business.  As such it remains Canada’s busiest market, with the biggest appetite for talent.  The financial, telecommunications, insurance and services sectors are all busy.  The construction business is booming and there is a vibrant high tech/startup community.

The Saddledome in CalgaryThere are plenty of signs that Western Canada is recovering from the oil sector meltdown.  While the oil and gas sector itself is not particularly vibrant, it has turned the corner and the worst of the downsizing and layoffs are finished.  Large companies will always need talent, to replace their retiring employees, for new projects and to bring new lifeblood into the organisation.  Governments in Western Canada are continuing to implement programs and projects that require talent, infrastructure spending is happening and there are opportunities, particularly in the larger centres.  BC is enjoying the lowest unemployment rate in the country and Alberta is starting to see jobs come back.  Saskatchewan continues to be a leader in promoting business and hence job opportunities and Manitoba too is doing well.  Overall the West is in a good place.

Parliament building in OttawaEagle’s Eastern Canada region covers Ottawa, Montreal & the “Maritimes”.  Ottawa is very much a government town again, and there are opportunities in the Feds, which is returning to its employment highs of some years ago.  The tech sector in Ottawa is alive and well with some up and comers, like Shopify and Assent Compliance joinng the Mitels and others that have been around a while.  While not providing the opportunities of Toronto, Ottawa does have some demand for talent.  Quebec appears to be enjoying a renaissance as its unemployment rate is now better than Ontario’s, in addition to having healthier finances.  They have been able to attract industries (such as large data centres) to help the economy and add jobs.  It doesn’t hurt that their hydro rates are very competitive as opposed to Ontario’s situation.  The Maritime Provinces don’t represent a great opportunity for the job seeker, however PEI and Nova Scotia are both showing signs of an improving economy.

The Hot Client Demand.

At Eagle our focus in on professional staffing and the people in demand from our clients have been fairly consistent for some time.  Program Managers, Project Managers and Business Analysts always seem to be in demand. It might just be our focus, but Change Management and Organizational Excellence resources are in relatively high demand too. Digital, big data, data scientists, analytics, CRM, web (portal and self-serve) and mobile expertise (especially developers) are specializations that we are seeing more and more. On the Finance and Accounting side, we see a consistent need for Financial Analysts, Accountants with designations and public accounting experience plus Controllers as a fairly consistent talent request. Expertise in the Capital markets, both technical and functional, tends to be a constant ask in the GTA.  Technology experts with functional expertise in Health Care is another skill set that also sees plenty of demand.  This demand fluctuates based on geography and industry sectors, so we advise candidates to watch our website and apply for the roles for which they are best suited.

Outside of Eagle’s realm some of the in-demand skills include the classic tradespeople, drivers, and new tech skills like Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, video gaming skills etc.


Canada added more than 422,000 jobs last year, and with the unemployment rate at its lowest in 40 years it is a good time to be looking for work.

There are a number of factors creating this positive situation, including demographic shifts (retiring Baby Boomers), jobs moving to Canada from more expensive places like Silicon Valley and companies developing new technologies.  The large employers, such as banking sector, insurance sector, retail sector, telecommunications sector and the construction industry continue to demand talent. The growth of the “gig economy” creates new opportunities for people to define their own destiny and become mini-entrepreneurs, or build new enterprises.

Job seekers should research and understand the growing sectors and where the in-demand jobs are.  They also need to be willing to go where the work is!  If I was looking for work I would be moving to the larger centres, investing in in-demand skills and increasing my marketability with the right “attitude”.  Clearly the biggest job market is the GTA, but opportunity exists across the country.

In the hotter markets we are seeing clear skills shortages and the “in demand” people are receiving multiple job offers, giving them the ability to “pick and choose”.  So … IF you are looking people, and want to hire the best talent here are some things you should consider:

  1. Start the process early with a strong PLANNING phase;
  2. Develop very clean processes to find, screen, choose, hire and onboard these new resources (if you drag out the hiring process you WILL lose);
  3. Know that you will have a lot of competition and therefore speed in decision making will be critical;
  4. The job doesn’t stop there … a great retention strategy will be critical!

That was my look at the Canadian job market for the third quarter of 2017 and some of its influences.

Kevin Dee is the founder and Chairman of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Board!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) Virtual Recruiter service?

December Tech News

IT Industry News - December 2017This is my 30,000 foot look at events in the Tech industry for December 2017. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of previous year’s Novembers

Oracle logo a large software company originally noted for its databaseFive years ago, in December 2012 there was a fair amount of M&A activity with Oracle making two acquisitions, marketing automation company Eloqua ($871 million) and Dataraker which provides analytics for utilities companies.  The big deal of the month saw Sprint pay $2.2 Billion to take full control of cellular competitor Clearwire.   Montreal based Cogeco paid $635 million for Peer 1 Networks and NCR paid $635 million for retail software and services company Retalix.  In the BYOD space Citrix bought mobile device management company Zenprise for $355 million.  Finally, Redknee added 1200 employees and 130 new clients through the purchase of Nokia Siemens’ Business Support Network. IBM logoDecember 2013 was a slow month, however Oracle pulled off a $1.5 billion buy of marketing software company Responsys; Akamai paid $370 million for cloud-based security solutions provider Prolexic; JDS Uniphase paid $200 million for enterprise performance management company Network Instruments; IBM bought a “big data” file compression company Aspera and Hitachi expended its solutions capability with the purchase of Calgary based Ideaca.  In other company news Target, although not an IT company, had a major security breach involving details of 40 million debit and credit cards.  Three years ago December 2014 was not such a slow news month, with the political and technical ramifications of “the Sony hack” causing uproar, some very positive economic indicators out of the US and some big names making acquisitions, albeit not huge deals.  Microsoft made two acquisitions, the $200 million purchase of mobile email app startup Acompli and mobile development company HockeyApp (which has nothing to do with hockey).  SAP bought travel and expense management company Concur; Intel bought a Montreal based identity management company PasswordBox; Oracle bought digital marketing company Datalogix; Teradata bought data archiving company Rainstor; and MongoDB bought high-scale storage engine company WiredTiger. December 2015 was not a busy M&A month but there was some interesting activity.  The big deal saw Canadian telco Shaw make a big play into the cellular space with its proposed acquisition of Wind for $1.6 billion.  Meanwhile Rogers was also out shopping and growing its Maritimes presence through the acquisition of Internetworking Atlantic Inc.  Other deals in December were not large but did feature some of the big players.  Oracle bought Stackhouse a cloud company with a specialization in “containers”; IBM boosted its video in the cloud capabilities with the purchase of Clearleap; and Microsoft picked up a mobile communications company, Talko.  Other deals saw Ingram Micro buy the Odin Service Automation business from Parallels and in the storage world Carbonite bought Evault from Uber logoSeagate.  Last year in December 2016 Adecco sold its majority stake in Beeline VMS to GTRC, a private equity firm, for $100 million in cash plus a $30 million note; CRN solution provider SS&C purchased asset service firm Conifer for $88.5 million; solution provider QRX Technology Group acquired IT equipment provider Kerr Norton; networking solution provider, Juniper Networks acquired cloud operations management provider AppFormix; Uber bought start-up Geometric Intelligence Inc.; and Shopify acquired Tiny Hearts, a Toronto-based mobile product development studio.  Yahoo hit the news revealing that one billion accounts were hacked in 2013 making it the largest data breach recorded in history.

Which brings us back to the present …

The apple logo and apple with a bite out of itDecember 2017 saw Atos enhance the footprint of their IT Services firm by paying $5 billion for Gemalto.  Apple were busy, paying $400 million for music recognition app Shazam plus they invested $390 million into optical communications components company Finisar.  Finally, in a relatively quiet M&A month Ingram Micro increased its data protection capability through the purchase of Cloud Harmonics.

The Canadian economy had some positive indicators, adding jobs and reducing the unemployment rate to 5.9%.  The US also continued its growth rate, albeit at a slightly reduced pace although the announced tax changes for business are going to provide a significant stimulus.  Generally reports from around the globe were fairly positive, with job growth and reduced unemployment in most countries.

There was a cautionary report about ransomware in Canada that might suggest up to 44% of SMBs were hit with ransomware in a 12 month period.

That’s what I saw affecting the tech industry for December 2017.

Until next month Walk Fast and Smile!

Kevin Dee is the founder and Chairman of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Board!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) Virtual Recruiter service?

Great Salespeople Ask Questions!

Brian Tracy quote about making assumptionsWe have all heard the saying, “You should never assume, because when you assume, you make an ass of ‘u’and ‘me’.” 

The problem is that we still do it.

Consider just a couple of very simple situations.

The CIO says, “We won’t be spending anything now until next year.”  The salesperson takes this onboard, makes a mental note to check back in October to have lots of planning time.

The CIO actually means “next fiscal year” … which starts in March!

The COO tells the salesperson that his spending will increase by 100% next year.  The salesperson plugs that number into his forecast and creates a sales plan around getting his share of that extra spend.

The COO did not share that 80% of that total spend is earmarked for a capital purchase, meaning that the actual services spend is going to decrease significantly.

“The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place.”  George Bernard Shaw

A big part of a salesperson’s role is to understand and qualify opportunities.

The way to do that is to ask questions … probe, qualify and confirm that what you heard is what the person meant you to hear!

Then ask more questions!

The salesperson could confirm what the CIO said by saying,  “So if I were to schedule a followup meeting in October would that give us enough time to plan?”  This would surface the confusion and would lead to more questions about budget, planning and how the salesperson could best bring value.

Similarly the salesperson could confirm the COO’s statement by suggesting that this would mean a big increase in services spend, to which the COO could provide clarification.

A salesperson should always be prepared when heading into client meetings, and a list of desired information,  desired contacts and a meeting agenda will help to get the right outcome.

“Success occurs when preparation meets opportunity.”  Zig Ziglar

Kevin Dee is the founder and Chairman of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Board!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) Virtual Recruiter service?




November 2017 Tech News

Tech News HeaderThis is my 30,000 foot look at events in the Tech industry for November 2017. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of previous year’s Novembers

Five years ago in November 2012 Cisco made two significant “buys”, cloud infrastructure company Meraki ($1.2B) and cloud datacentre and software company Cloupia ($125M); Dell bought software tools company Gale Technologies; NCR bought retail software company Retalix ($650M); Cray bought software company Appro ($25M); Sprint Nextel bought a chunk of US Cellular ($480M); and Toronto based NexJ (headed by another ex-Andersen Consulting alumni) bought Broadstreet for $8.2 million.   In November 2013 Opentext paid $1.1 Billion for cloud based integration services company GXS Group and another Canadian deal saw Mitel buy Aastra for close to $400 million.  Other deals included ebay’s $800 million purchase of global payments company Braintree; Apple’s $370 million purchase of 3D sensor company PrimeSense; and Akamai’s purchase of Velocius Networks. Three years ago November 2014 was an exceptionally quiet month on the M&A front with the largest deal being the merger of two semiconductor companies, Cypress Semiconductor and Spansion to form a $4 billion company; private equity company Carlyle Group paid $700 million for investment bank technology company Dealogic and Yahoo shelled out $640 million for video advertising company BrightRoll.  November 2015 saw expedia pay $3.9 billion for HomeAway as a vehicle to better compete with Airbnb.  Zayo Holding Group became the first foreign company to own a Canadian telco after paying $465 million for Allstream.  Other, smaller deals saw Apple buy Faceshift, a motion capture company whose technology was used in a Star Wars movie; and Lightspeed POS bought SEOshop, increasing its size as a competitor to Shopify.  Other deals saw Ingram Micro grow its Brazilian presence with the purchase of ACAO; PCM bought Edmonton based services firm Acrodex; Data centre company CentriLogic bought infrastructure company Advanced Knowledge Networks; solution provider Scalar Systems bought another Toronto company, professional services firm Eosensa; and Washington based New Signature bought Toronto based Microsoft Partner, Imason.  Last year November 2016 saw Broadcom acquire Brocade Communication Systems for $5.9 billion; Adobe purchased multi-channel programmatic video platform TubeMogul for $540 million; IT services and outsourcing provider Wipro Limited bought IT cloud consulting firm Appirio for $500 million; Oracle Corp. announced its plans to acquire DNS solution provider, Dyn Inc.; SoftwareOne acquired and integrated House of Lync; and Avnet completed an acquisition of Hackster.

Which brings us back to the present …

November 2017 saw some interesting information from countries round the world.  China’s growth slowed a little, India is struggling in the IT jobs space and there are some negative some effects from the upcoming Brexit that are affecting the UK and EU.  The US is looking strong again following a hurricane affected dip and Canada added 35,000 jobs in October.

The Big M&A activity for the month sees investment firm Thoma Bravo pay $1.6 billion for Barracuda networks.  McAfee also made an acquisition of Skyhigh Networks now that they are no longer a part of the Intel group of companies.  Smaller deals saw Talend buy Restlet and Qualys buy Netwatcher.

Other companies in the news include Lenovo, a struggling hardware company in a declining PC market and laying off 2% of their workforce.  The other company of interest was Uber who revealed a massive security breach which they had neglected to mention when it happened a year ago!

That’s what I saw affecting the tech industry for November 2017.  Until next month Walk Fast and Smile!

Kevin Dee is the founder and Chairman of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Board!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) Virtual Recruiter service?

Making the Most of Your 8 Hours

Time quote from H Jackson BrownIf you could be convinced that it is in your best interests to be very productive at work then what could you do to be so productive?

WHY should you be your most productive?

  • It feels good.
  • It is how you get ahead.
  • If you have variable compensation it is how you earn more.
  • It is probably the only job security available in the modern workplace.
  • If you can be super productive in your 8 hours then you should not NEED to work longer … giving you more personal time.
  • You have to be here anyway, so why not be the best you can?

What can you do?

  • Drive your day as much as you possibly can … rather than being reactive to things that drive you.
  • Prioritise work and focus your efforts where the highest return is.
  • Be a planner … plan your day, your week, your month, your quarter and ultimatley your year!
  • Develop GOOD work habits.
  • Be VERY conscious of where you are spending your time … and focus the majority of your time on high return activity.
  • Minimise wasted time.
  • Look for ways to be more efficient.
  • Ask for advice.
  • Invest in yourself … training and development, both company sponsored and personally.

“I must govern the clock, not be governed by it.”  Golda Meir

There is a lot of self satisfaction from being good at your job.  I try to explain to people that the work you do every day is for you, not for your boss.  The skills you learn, and the experience you get stay with you for life, and position you for future success.  Your boss just gets the benefit of them as long as you are in that job.

As the slogan once said, “Be all that you can be.”

Kevin Dee is the founder and Chairman of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Board!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) Virtual Recruiter service?

Contracts Are Important

Branson quote about having time for the small thingsAs a young salesperson it always seemed like contracts took all of the fun out of a sale.  There is the “high” of getting a YES from a client but then you have to get a contract agreed, with all of that “legal stuff”.

My experience is that many companies really don’t pay attention to the detail of a contract, and rather than negotiate will basically sign anything … hoping that it doesn’t come back to bite them!

There is some logic to that approach because in the large majority of situations the other party will not take advantage … but sometimes they will.

There are several reasons why it is important to negotiate a reasonable and fair contract that pays attention to the detail.

  • It protects the interests of both parties, not just one.
  • If you are signing on behalf of your company then you have a responsibility to protect the interests of your employer.
  • If you agree to poor contract details it is a fair bet your management will be unimpressed.
  • A clear contract makes decision making easy.
  • A good understanding of the contract detail is a show of professionalism and given that a contract is often a first business  interactions with a client you should start off in a professional manner.

If you go about the negotiation in the correct manner you can get through the contract negotiations with a minimum of fuss and have a good professional start to to a business relationship.  Don’t make the mistake of thinking you are being “difficult” when you are just doing your job.

Kevin Dee is the founder and Chairman of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Board!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) Virtual Recruiter service?

Take Responsibility for Your Own Career

Lincoln quote about creating your own futureDo you OWN your career?

Ask yourself a few questions …

Am I “drifting” in a general direction that life is taking me … or am I on a path that I chose?

Do I know what I want from my career?

Am I making conscious decisions that will get me where I want to be in my career?

Am I investing in myself … outside and in addition to, what my employer offers?

Am I taking full advantage of the development opportunities my employer gives me?

Am I getting advice from people other than my boss, my family and my friends?

Do I understand what the future looks like in my chosen career, what disruption will happen, where the opportunities are etc?

These questions are just designed to get you thinking.  There is so much that you could be doing today … but you have to realise it, and then be willing to make that investment.

Kevin Dee is the founder and Chairman of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Board!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) Virtual Recruiter service?