CEO Blog

Category Archives: Government

All blog posts by Kevin Dee, Chairman at Eagle — Canada’s premier staffing agency, related to government.

With Position Comes Responsibility

It seems like a fairly obvious statement and yet it is all too often forgotten.

If you are the CEO of a large public company you have legal and ethical responsibilities … which is why we see CEOs fired for behaviours not consistent with their role, and even CEOs jailed (think Tyco and Worldcom etc) for failing in their legal duties.

If you are a manager or executive you are expected to be a good example to your staff, to demonstrate good behaviours not just expect your staff to “do as you say”.

The other thing about position though is that it can corrupt.  Some people become “entitled”, they are above the rules … an extreme example of this would be all of the Catholic priests who abused their positions of power.

It is the kind of thing you see as you make your way up the corporate ladder … the managers who take advantage of their staff and the executives who revel in the perks.  The owner/managers who expect their staff to work long hours but are not prepared to do it themselves etc.

So … as you assume positions of power there are a few things you might want to think about:

1.  One of the many ways in which our world is changing is in the area of transparency … it is really difficult to “get away” with poor behaviour.

2.  The higher up the chain you go … the higher the expectations, be careful what you wish for!

3.  You will reap the rewards of your behaviour … good and/or bad!

4.   You set the example for those who work for you … do not expect your people to work hard when you goof off at Noon on Friday!  (Remember EVERYBODY KNOWS).

5.  Develop a strong ethical compass … and don’t let the temptations of power take you off course.

Good leaders set the right example … if you really want that next position, be ready to go to the next level of ethical standards too!

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Kevin Dee is CEO of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Gain a competitive edge!  Join Eagle’s Executive Consulting Network!
Find Canada’s top hot jobs, updated in real-time!  Visit Eagle’s Job Centre!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) VirtualRecruiter service?
________________________________________________________________


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Life is Full of Choices

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Kevin Dee is CEO of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Centre!

Gain a competitive edge!  Join Eagle’s Executive Consulting Network!

Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) VirtualRecruiter service?

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IT INDUSTRY NEWS – January 2013

This is my 30,000 foot look at events in the ICT industry for January 2013. What you see here is a précis of the monthly report I produce, which will be available in more detail at the News section of the Eagle website, where you will also find back issues.

A Little History of previous year’s Januarys …

Five years ago in January 2008, there was much talk about an impending recession.  Dell, Palm and Yahoo all announced layoffs, while Oracle paid $8.5 Billion for BEA, Microsoft paid $1.2 Billion for FAST and SUN paid $1 Billion for MySQL.  In January 2009 the world’s economies melted down! The one sizeable M&A deal was the $775 million purchase of Interwoven by Autonomy.  Confidence with IT workers and CEOs alike was at an all time low, and there was a long list of (significant) companies announcing layoffs.  Satyam announced a major financial accounting scam and former Canadian “tech star” Nortel, filed for bankruptcy protection.  Three Januarys ago in Twenty-Ten there was cautious optimism in the air, but not much in the way of blockbuster M&A deals however Oracle, Apple, EMC, and Cisco continued their fairly steady acquisition pace.  Perhaps the most interesting acquisition saw PWC here in Canada return to the IT consulting business with the acquisition of Allstream’s non-telecom consulting business, several years after exiting the business by selling it to IBM.  In other news Apple released the much anticipated iPad.  In January 2011 economic news was generally positive, Steve Jobs announced his leave of absence from Apple and Larry Page assumed the CEO role at Google.  There were also some big M&A deals, the largest being the $3.1 Billion acquisition of Atheros Communications by Qualcomm.  Verizon paid $1.4 Billion for Teremark Worldwide and IGate paid $1.2 Billion for Patni Computer Systems.  Also out spending money were Dell, Google, Cisco and Salesforce.com. Things were very quiet in M&A last year in January 2012.  Former tech giant JDSU was back on the acquisition trail, even if just to pick up a small Vancouver based company, Dyaptive Systems.  Symantec paid $115 million for LiveOffice to help with its storage capabilities, Google bought a bunch more IBM patents, and Xerox picked up Laser Networks in the managed printing space.  Rim also announced its change of leadership. 

Which brings us back to the present …

January 2013 was a big month for Canadian darling Research in Motion with the long awaited release of its next generation PDA and associated software.  The company also changed its name to Blackberry.  Early reviews were generally positive, the proof however will require the recapture of significant market share.

In M&A activity Cisco was busy picking up yet another Israeli company, mobile network software company Intucell for $475 million.  Cisco is investing heavily in Israel, with this being its 10th acquisition there in the last 12 years.  Cisco also sold its Linksys division to Belkin.  The biggest dollar value deal was AT&T’s purchase of some of Verison Wireless’s airwaves for $1.9 Billion.  Other deals saw NCR buy video software ASTM company uGenius Technology; Canon Canada acquired long-time partner and document management company Oce Canada; NetSuite bought retail management systems company Retail Anywhere; and AVI-SPL bought Duocom-Duologik.  The Canadian Federal Government also released details about how it would make $400 million available for startups.

Speaking of Federal Government departments HRSDC ran into data leak problems for the second time in just a few months, losing a portable hard drive with 585,000 personal records.  Apple also did some house cleaning of suppliers identifying and cutting ties with companies supplying child labour.

Economic indicators continue to be mixed … how long have we been saying that now?  In December Canada’s job situation was decent gaining 40,000 jobs and the unemployment rate dropping 0.1% to 7.1%.  A BMO survey also showed some optimism among Canadians about hiring plans. The US released January labour data that was generally positive, other than the unemployment rate rose from 7.8% to 7.9%.  Over in the UK the number of people out of work dropped in the September to November quarter by 37,000 and the unemployment rate dropped to 7.7% which is down 0.7% from a year ago.  The ILO released a report suggesting global unemployment rose in 2012 after two years going the other way, with 197 million people unemployed globally.

I would have to characterize January as “more of the same” that we have been seeing for some time now.  One of these months I will be talking about the buoyant economy, but until then … Walk Fast and Smile!

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Kevin Dee is CEO of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Centre!
Gain a competitive edge!  Join Eagle’s Executive Consulting Network!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) VirtualRecruiter service?
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The Holiday Season

This time of year in Canada has traditionally been a time to give … people who celebrate Christmas give presents, but even beyond the religious significance of “the Holiday Season” Canadians are particularly generous to those in need.

“There is no exercise better for the heart than reaching down and lifting people up.” … John Holmes

Personally I find the season to be one of excess … many people drink too much, eat too much and spend too much money on things that they don’t really need.  Families take on debt to be able to give their children the same gifts that more affluent families can afford. 

At the same time it really highlights the gap between the “haves” and the “have nots”.  The family that has no income takes little comfort in Canada’s relatively decent unemployment rate, and those in our society who can’t afford presents, big dinners and increased costs are dependant upon the generosity of all Canadians.

“No one has ever become poor by giving.” … Anne Frank

Most people reading this are lucky, have jobs, enjoy a good standard of living and can afford those extra luxuries at this time of year.

Perhaps the BEST gift you can give is to be generous to those who can’t afford it themselves.

Dig deep and help someone out … it could be the food banks, the snow suit funds, the children’s charities, the hospitals and shelters.  It could be a neighbour who needs a little help or a retirement home that could benefit from some attention. How we treat those in need is the true measure of our society … do your bit!

“Doing nothing for others is the undoing of ourselves.” … Horace Mann

________________________________________________________________
Kevin Dee is CEO of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Gain a competitive edge!  Join Eagle’s Executive Consulting Network!
Find Canada’s top hot jobs, updated in real-time!  Visit Eagle’s Job Centre!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) VirtualRecruiter service?
________________________________________________________________


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Why Be an Independent Contractor?

I recently read that there is a growing trend of people choosing to work for them-self.  The most likely form of doing this is as an independent contractor … and given the business I am in, I get to meet a lot of these people.

The independent contractor is sometimes viewed with suspicion by regulatory bodies like the tax people (CRA), Worker’s compensation etc.  I have written previously about the value that independent contractors bring to our economy, but I thought it might be worthwhile describing some of the many reasons people choose to be contractors … because I can assure you in most cases it has nothing to do with paying less tax.

There are a number of fields where contractors are more established, the technology world, the engineering world and the construction industry are just three … focusing on those worlds, here are some reasons why people become independent contractors:

1.  Control.   I belive that the number one reason people choose to be contractors is freedom of choice.  They are typically accomplished at their job and they want the ability to choose what projects they work on, who they work with and where they work … none of which is available to an employee.

2.  Career.  This is very big in technical worlds like IT and engineering.  The traditional career path sees people who are excellent technically get pushed out of their technical jobs and into management positions.  Their role changes from 80% technical challenges, 20% people issues (because they still manage teams, interface with clients and suppliers etc) to become an 80% people management role and a 20% technical role (the 20% coming in the time after 5pm!)  The traditional path doesn’t work for everyone … contracting allows people to earn good money AND stay technical.

3.  A Way to Build a Company.  Some of Canada’s largest technology companies (and I have to believe many construction companies) started with a contractor or a group of contractors.  Cognos, Calian, CGI, Systemhouse all come to mind.  If a contractor wants to start their own company, then becoming an independent contractor allows them flexibility to work on that plan, teaches them basic business skills as a one person company and allows them to nurture future partner relationships.

4.  Travel.  Having the flexibility to move to where the work is can be a necessity in a tough economy, and some people come to love it.  As a contractor with good skills you can move to where the interesting jobs are … working in warmer or even exotic climates is not out of the question.

5.  Company Politics.  Many organizations experience internal politics, in-fighting and positioning amongst employees.  One of the nice things about being a contractor is the ability to just focus on the job and not get caught up in the politics.

6.  Necessity.  Even the best people can find themselves out of work in a tough economy.  Employers are less likely to increase their permanent headcount during this time too, so contracting is a great alternative for people with the right skills.

7.  Money.  An independent contractor can make more money than an employee in a similar role, but they have to accept the associated risks too.  They only make more money if they can stay fully billable, they are responsible for their own skills development, marketing and benefits (no pensions plans for the self employed).  Having said all that there is “an upside” to their income that is not always available to an employee.

8.  Part Time Work.  For some people who are nearing retirement the ability to pick and choose how much they work, where they work and the types of work they will do is very desirable.  They might not be quite ready for retirement, they might have other things they want to do with their time or they might just need to supplement their income.  There is always a demand for people with good skills and this is a way to work without a commitment to full-time work.

I don’t know what the percentage of the work force is self employed, but it is a definitely a small percentage.  They are a part of Canada’s small business community, offer our economy a flexible labour pool and bring a ton of value to their clients.   They might be the genesis of Canada’s next large companies or just the labour force that will help our economy through the coming labour shortages.

It is the right career choice for some, but the majority of people still prefer traditional employment … and that works out just fine all around.

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Kevin Dee is CEO of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Gain a competitive edge!  Join Eagle’s Executive Consulting Network!
Find Canada’s top hot jobs, updated in real-time!  Visit Eagle’s Job Centre!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) VirtualRecruiter service?
________________________________________________________________


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Assumptions Can Hurt in a Job Search

It seems like I am always talking about change, the pace of change and in particular what that means to people in today’s work force.  Just about a year ago I wrote about how the Talent Landscape has Changed , and what that might mean to you.

IF you, like me, believe that SO MUCH has changed in just a few short years, then you need to be very wary of OLD ASSUMPTIONS!

We all tend to have them, they come from previous experiences, they are bred into us as children from our parent’s experiences and over a lifetime we tend to adopt them as fact.

If you look at the job market today it would be easy to apply the same beliefs you had years ago, or even just a few years ago before the recession.  Yet the job market in particular has changed enormously in a short space of time.

Canada’s economy is one of the best in the world but we still have more than 7% unemployment, AND we have jobs going unfilled every day!

If you are looking for work you might need to reset your expectations.  Here are some thoughts for you:

1.  Temporary and contract work is growing … even if it is not your preferred answer, it gives you (a) a pay cheque; (b) an “in” to an employer; (c) good experience; and (d) it is always better to look for work when employed!

2.  The work may not be available in your geography … but maybe you should consider moving to where the work is.  traditionally Canadians have been slower to move for work, unlike the US, but being employed is a big part of anyone’s life so you should give it real consideration, even if the math is tough at the beginning.

3.  You have always been a <fill in the blank> … but just maybe you need to consider something different that could take advantage of your skills.  Maybe you are an out of work programmer with “old skills” … you could consider becoming a recruiter for instance.  Maybe you worked in an auto plant, maybe you should consider the oil fields of Alberta.

4.  The “salesperson” is one of the more maligned professions, with a hangover from the “car salesman” perceptions.  Almost every company needs a sales force and it is salespeople that generate the business that keeps those companies going.  Do you have what it takes to be a salesperson … or do your old attitudes, opinions and assumptions get in the way?

Don’t answer any of these questions based on your immediate “gut reaction” … take some time to research, ask questions and truly understand what opportunities you might be overlooking.

The people that figure out this new world first will be the winners!

“Your assumptions are your windows on the world. Scrub them off every once in awhile, or the light won’t come in.”   Alan Alda
________________________________________________________________
Kevin Dee is CEO of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Gain a competitive edge!  Join Eagle’s Executive Consulting Network!
Find Canada’s top hot jobs, updated in real-time!  Visit Eagle’s Job Centre!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) VirtualRecruiter service?
________________________________________________________________

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Creating Jobs

Every economy in the world is trying to battle unemployment, and Canada is no different.  With unemployment in the 7.3% range it is not TOO bad compared to other economies, but the good news does obscure some of the growing problems.

1.  There are skills shortages.  Even though there are (good) people looking for jobs there are jobs going unfilled because companies can’t get the right skills.

2.  The skills needed in our economy have changed.  The demand is both geographic (the oil sands being a great example) and by industry sector/skill-set (the knowledge sector, banking and high tech being good examples, is a high growth area).  There is a diminished need for unskilled labour in production facilities for instance, because companies have shipped this off to lower cost countries … yet labour is needed in Alberta.  The trades generally struggle to find enough people.

3.  Demographics.  We have been talking about it for years, but it is here … masked a little by a recession that hurt people’s ability to retire early.  The Boomers are ready to retire and that will leave a large gap in knowledge, experience and “bums in seats”!

4.  Canadian Willingness/Capacity to Invest.  If you want to create the next big employer in Canada then you need investment, and all too often the Canadian entrepreneur with a great idea ends up going South to get their funding.  This results in the intellectual property, jobs and tax income all going South too!

So … what can we do?

1.  We have to recognise there is a problem, and that it can’t be solved by government alone, or by industry alone.

2.  We need to focus our efforts where they are going to bring the biggest gains.

3.  We need to continue to make Canada a place where people want to come.  It is the greatest country on Earth to live, but we need to work hard to keep it that way … the world is in competition to attract the best talent!  Do we understand that?

4.   We need to figure out a way to take advantage of people’s skills when they get here.  My dental hygienist was a dentist in Brazil, I have been in taxis driven by accountants … how much sense does that make?

5.  We need to find ways to get the labour where it is needed.  We have communities devastated because a factory moved out, and we have huge demand for labour in other parts of the country.

6.  Our education system needs to be geared towards the skills our economy is going to need.  Why do we have declining enrolment in the sciences and technology when that is where the demand will be?

7.  Our governments need to recognise that jobs that bring tax dollars into the economy are private sector jobs … I recently saw a description of public sector jobs as “recycled taxes”.  Don’t get me wrong … we NEED our public servants, but need a small, highly productive, motivated public service that supports the growth of private sector jobs.

8.  We need to find ways to keep Canadian companies in Canada for longer … creating long term Canadian tax revenues, jobs and wealth here.  That does not mean propping up under performing companies … but it does mean getting the infrastructure in place (funding included) to support Canadian entrepreneurs.

9.  We need more education/perhaps a better PR campaign to bring these issues front and center.  There are too many people living in the past, thinking that because it was “that way” last year it should stay “that way”.  The new realities can be harsh for some, but the sooner we all get on the same page the better for everyone!  Like any entity, be it a family, a company, a city or a country … we have to live within our means!

10.  We need to get creative about the resources we have.  There is money “sitting on the sidelines” because market returns have not been great … so how do we get that to the entrepreneurs?   There is expertise sitting at home … retired knowledge workers, parents on maternity leave, underemployed professionals, people in the wrong city … there must be a way to tap into that talent!

The number one problem for the future of this country’s economy is generating enough tax dollars to maintain the standard of living that we all want.  That includes the social net, education, health care and all of the services we enjoy today.  To do that we need to have enough jobs, and our workforce need the right skills to be able to do those jobs.  Government and private sector need to work this out … together!

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Kevin Dee is CEO of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Centre!
Gain a competitive edge!  Join Eagle’s Executive Consulting Network!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) VirtualRecruiter service?
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Luck … or Something Else?

I commented to another business owner (Amanda O’Reilly) yesterday how lucky I am in my life.  Having recently moved to a home on Lake Simcoe, and splitting my time between there and a beautiful downtown Toronto condo (where I can walk to work).

Amanda’s comment was, “I don’t believe in luck!”

I had to laugh, but replied that I think there had to be a little luck … also a lot of hard work, a willingness to take a risk AND a belief that I could “make it happen”!  Amanda understands all this having started her own very successful Ottawa based concierge business (Balance in Style) and added some interesting offerings, including a great option for people wanting a nice, yet affordable wedding or some other event!  Amongst all that work, managing risk and making things happen we sometimes downplay that we need a little luck too!

The conversation got me to thinking about the subject of entrepreneurship and luck.  I saw a poster called “I am an Entrepreneur” and it formed a blog I posted a few months ago.  I think the word LUCK was missing from the graphic … all those other things are absolutely necessary, but we all need a little luck along the way too.

I also wrote a blog entry some time ago about entrepreneurship’s risk and rewards with a focus on Matt Whitteker, another successful young Ottawa based entrepreneur (and my boxing coach for that charity boxing match I did last year).   At 26 Matt had three businesses on the go, had won 40 under 40 awards and is flying … but even Matt needed a little luck.

Entrepreneurs come in all shapes and sizes, they have businesses of all types and sizes … yet they all have some things in common.  Maybe one of them is a belief in that classic Samuel Goldwyn quote, “The harder I work, the luckier I get!”

While thinking about this I am reminded of the many attempts by government to help “entrepreneurship”, to stimulate job creation with “programs and funding” … some of which might help.  BUT in my humble opinion, you can lead a horse to water but unless the horse is willing to work hard, take risks and do whatever it takes to be successful it aint going to drink that entrepreneurship water!!  The only way governments are going to succeed in stimulating entrepreneurship is by having entrepreneurs driving those initiatives … and we have seen that in Ottawa since Bruce Lazenby has taken the reins at Invest Ottawa.

So, I still believe we ALL need luck, entrepreneurs most of all … but when you have all that other stuff, you can really improve your chances of getting some “luck” (ask Samuel Goldwyn)!

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Kevin Dee is CEO of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Centre!
Gain a competitive edge!  Join Eagle’s Executive Consulting Network!
Have you tried Eagle’s (very cost effective) VirtualRecruiter service?
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CANADIAN JOB MARKET – Second Quarter 2012

General Observations:

From a job market perspective, the second quarter of 2012 here in Canada has been very consistent for some time now.  The unemployment rate in June 2012 is 7.2%, the same as it was at the end of the first quarter which was a little better than the 7.5% at the end of December 2011.  As at the mid-year point we have added 181,000 jobs over the previous 12 months.

Western Canada remains one of the markets with the biggest demand, largely driven by the oil industry.  While the price of a barrel is down from the $110+ highs, it is still a healthy $85+ per barrel.  Other factors that affect the Western Canada job market include an ongoing environmental influence that keeps some check on oil industry growth, a strong Canadian dollar that dampens demand a little, and a low price of natural gas which has restricted investment in that sector.  Should the price of gas ever take off there will be a severe shortage of talent in the resource rich regions of Western Canada!

The financial sector in Canada, headquartered mostly in Toronto with strong presence in Montreal, continues to create demand for talent. Canada’s financial institutions have fared better than most around the world and are a big driver of job growth, most particularly in the GTA.

The instability with the Euro and a dampened US economy do negatively affect Canada’s economy and hence job growth.  The TSX is a good indicator of this impact, with highs of 13,500’s and lows of 10,800s in the last 12 months.  In the second quarter of 2012 the TSX has settled in around the 11,500 mark, whereas it had been above 12,500 in mid Q1.

Federal, Provincial and Municipal government employ a lot of people in Canada and all levels of government continue to find ways to reduce spending.  This has meant fewer projects, less hiring and active layoffs, particularly at the Federal level.  This all means that the public sector has not been a place to find job growth in Canada this year.

The staffing industry is a good indicator of the job market and the second quarter continues to be reasonably positive.   The Canadian Staffing Index (which is an indicator of hours worked by temporary and contract resources) has seen fairly steady growth this year and the May index was up 26% over the same month last year.

More Specifically:

For Eagle, the GTA (Greater Toronto Area) continues to be Canada’s hottest job market, largely because it is home to the largest number of Canadian head offices.  Toronto is also the largest financial centre in Canada, and that sector is currently one of the biggest drivers of demand for talent.   The other industry sectors driving demand here include retail, insurance and the telecommunications sectors.

As previously mentioned, it is the continued strength of the oil patch that keeps Calgary as the hottest job market in Western Canada with strong demand for skilled resources at all levels and across all of Eagle’s lines of business.  Edmonton and Regina are two smaller markets that also show strong demand for talent.  All of that means Western Canada is a good place to look for work.

Eagle’s Eastern Canada region is impacted largely by the Federal Governments cutbacks and reduced demand in Ottawa, however Montreal is enjoying fairly healthy demand, particularly in the financial, insurance and telecommunications industries.  The Maritime provinces are generally tough places to find jobs, however the ship building contracts for Halifax, plus the oil off Newfoundland seem to be creating some buzz.  SW Ontario is currently struggling as RIM comes to terms with its situation through attrition.

 Summary:

The first half of 2012 continues to be a little “ho hum”, with unemployment rates in the low to mid 7% range.  The challenges facing Europe and the US continue to dampen optimism and affect investment in growth.  While those regions are making some progress, it is not enough to remove the concern about slipping back into recession and until those risks are allayed we will continue on this cautious path.

Here at Eagle we are seeing good growth in demand from our client base year over year, but as we head into the Summer months we expect to see some slow down as holidays kick in and decision makers become harder to pin down.

If I were looking for work, the cities that I would be focused on would be Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton, Montreal and Regina … the city I would be avoiding, if possible, would be Ottawa!  The industries where I would focus would be the financial sector, the oil companies, telecommunications, insurance and retail.  The sector to avoid would be the public sector … although I expect that to change next year.

In the hotter markets there are definite skills shortages and we are seeing “in demand” people receiving multiple job offers and having the ability to “pick and choose”.  So … IF you want to hire the best talent here are some things you should consider:

(a) Start the process early with a strong PLANNING phase;

(b) Develop very clean processes to find, screen, choose, hire and onboard these new resources (if you drag out the hiring process you WILL lose);

(c) Know that you will have a lot of competition and therefore speed in decision making will be critical;

(d) The job doesn’t stop there … retention becomes the next challenge!

That was my quarterly look at the Canadian job market and some of its influences.

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Kevin Dee is CEO of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Want to know where Canada’s hot jobs are?   Visit the Eagle Job Centre!

Gain a competitive edge!  Join Eagle’s Executive Consulting Network!
—————————————————————————————————————————————–


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Time to Party

I take pleasure from many things in life … I look for the good, I focus on the positive and I work hard to eliminate or at least negate the negatives.  So, having a built-in reason to celebrate makes it VERY easy!!!

Here in North America we are about to celebrate some national holidays … and like many such celebrations they have evolved over the years, people have developed their own traditions and perhaps the original intents are not as important for some.

I’m not so sure it matters … if the essence of a Canada Day celebration for you is the celebration of Canada’s independence OR just a great opportunity to party its all OK.

In Canada we will be celebrating our independence (or just celebrating) on July 1st.  South of the border the US will be celebrating their independence on July 4th.  Its a good week for celebrating!!

To all my Canadian friends … Happy Canada Day.

To my friends in the states … wait another couple of days (or zip up to Canada for the weekend) and then you too can party like Canadians!!!

Find the good things to celebrate in your life … and when people make it easy for you, then make sure you take advantage.  Its time to be with friends and family, its a time to maybe drink and eat a little more than you should, its a time to laugh and tell stories, its a time to watch some fireworks … and maybe a time to reflect a little on those who have helped build these countries!

Let’s party!!!!

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Kevin Dee is CEO of Eagle (a Professional Staffing Company)
Gain a competitive edge! Join Eagle’s Executive Consulting Network!
Find Canada’s top hot jobs, updated in real-time! Visit Eagle’s Job Centre!
——————————————————————————————————————————


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