The Eagle Blog

Is it Enough to be Good at What You Do?

If you are an excellent salesperson, delivering consistently on your numbers, then management should give you “elbow room” on the “minor” aspects of your job … right?

If you regularly deliver your projects on time and under budget then the company shouldn’t worry about small policy items … right?

If you are a top recruiter, regularly finding candidates for your clients then who cares if you miss some paperwork here and there … right?

Certainly this line of thinking is common in some companies, but there are some minefields in that thinking … for both company and individual.

1. The minute you start to think that you are good is the minute you start to exude that message … and clients, co-workers and bosses really don’t like it.
2. To be “technically” good at your job is really just expected these days, once that is “under control” the individual needs to polish all of the other aspects of their game … the communication skills, presentation skills, their “look”, their “cache” with the company etc.
3. Situations change … the markets go soft, a client decides to move their business and all of a sudden the “star” isn’t looking so hot, not a good position if you are also labelled as having an “attitude”.
4. Good habits are developed over time and need to be maintained over time, so it is important to always work at being on top of your game, if you intend to get there and stay there!
5. If you are sloppy about “the little things” then your attention to detail will slip, and slip, and before you know it you have worked hard to develop habits … except they are bad ones!
6. Sometimes what are “the little things” to you, are not considered the same way by management.

For my part, I will take someone with a good attitude and a willingness to work at getting better over a so called “superstar” any day!

Thought for the day … Do you really know what management think of you? Are you a legend in your own mind … just waiting to take a fall?


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4 thoughts on “Is it Enough to be Good at What You Do?

  1. Sirrah, I must disagree with the tenor and ideas present’d in this work, for it seems to me to be nothing more than a discouragement to those who, upon realizing that they are gifted with an aptitude for something that others are willing to pay for, naturally become proud of thier accomplishments.

    Unfortunatly your article has taken the “You ain’t such hot sh*t” approach, a direct shot at deflating egos that may have been starting to become overinflated. Deflate an ego in this way, and what you will be left with is a broken individual, whose creativity and openminded approach to solving the problems placed before him has been demonstrated to him as having less value to the company he is working so hard for than a couple of missed dots over the “i’s” and missed crosses over the “t’s”

    Instead of placing the onus on the employee, should not the responsibility lie with managment to recognize obvious talent, and utilize that talent in such a way as to atain the most benefit from it? Is not an attitude that you are “good” at what you do better than an attitude that you are “merely competant?” Take these people aside, give them an office, and a secretary to dot their I’s and cross their t’s and let them show your company what they can REALLY do…and if the market goes soft, be a good manager, be innovative and find a use for your gifted employee’s talents.

    There are thousands of individuals who are willing to bend and scrape to the will of the middle managment in order to get ahead in thier careers. It’s those that are not, those that have pride in thier abilities and are permitted to forge ahead with thier brilliant ideas that make companies stronger. Following all the rules and doing things “The way they have always been done” eventually takes a person nowhere.

  2. Sirrah, I must disagree with the tenor and ideas present’d in this work, for it seems to me to be nothing more than a discouragement to those who, upon realizing that they are gifted with an aptitude for something that others are willing to pay for, naturally become proud of thier accomplishments.

    Unfortunatly your article has taken the “You ain’t such hot sh*t” approach, a direct shot at deflating egos that may have been starting to become overinflated. Deflate an ego in this way, and what you will be left with is a broken individual, whose creativity and openminded approach to solving the problems placed before him has been demonstrated to him as having less value to the company he is working so hard for than a couple of missed dots over the “i’s” and missed crosses over the “t’s”

    Instead of placing the onus on the employee, should not the responsibility lie with managment to recognize obvious talent, and utilize that talent in such a way as to atain the most benefit from it? Is not an attitude that you are “good” at what you do better than an attitude that you are “merely competant?” Take these people aside, give them an office, and a secretary to dot their I’s and cross their t’s and let them show your company what they can REALLY do…and if the market goes soft, be a good manager, be innovative and find a use for your gifted employee’s talents.

    There are thousands of individuals who are willing to bend and scrape to the will of the middle managment in order to get ahead in thier careers. It’s those that are not, those that have pride in thier abilities and are permitted to forge ahead with thier brilliant ideas that make companies stronger. Following all the rules and doing things “The way they have always been done” eventually takes a person nowhere.

  3. It is always good to have differing points of view. I would have agreed with you maybe fifteen years ago, or even ten years ago … however that was when I thought I was hot stuff!

    There is always so much more to learn, and a little humility coupled with good skills takes you a lot further than good skills and attitude.

  4. It is always good to have differing points of view. I would have agreed with you maybe fifteen years ago, or even ten years ago … however that was when I thought I was hot stuff!

    There is always so much more to learn, and a little humility coupled with good skills takes you a lot further than good skills and attitude.

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