The Eagle Blog

The Management Role

Sometimes it really strikes me how much of a managers time is spent dealing with “people issues”. So:

(a). If you aspire to a management position you need to understand how much of your time is going to spent on issues that have nothing to do with your ability to do a good job. You might be a great sales person (or engineer) but once you become a sales manager (or engineering manager) a huge amount of your time will be dealing with people issues rather than with sales productivity (or engineering solutions)! Not what you expect!

I read all the management guru books too … so please don’t tell me that is just because I am doing things wrong, or I have the wrong people on the bus! Sit in a room with 10 other CEOs and they will tell you exactly the same thing … this is experience talking!

(b). Eagle is an IT Staffing company and one of the under appreciated, and therefore “heavily discounted” benefits of using the contract resources that we supply, is that the client management does not have to deal with their “personnel issues”. The contractor arrives to do a job, does it and gets well paid to do it … and then they are gone! That is huge!

I had a conversation recently with a senior military officer who swears he spends 75 to 80% of his time dealing with personnel issues. I know there are many managers in the same boat … which in some situations validates the contractor solution based on the increased management productivity alone!

Worth thinking about! The staffing industry brings many benefits to our clients and this is just one … but it IS under appreciated and deserves the spotlight, at least for this blog entry!!!


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2 thoughts on “The Management Role

  1. Years ago, when I was promoted to Project Leader I thought it was a reward for being a very successful senior programmer/analyst.

    It didn’t take me long to realize that being a manager requires a vastly different set of skills than being a senior P/A. Moreover, the new job seemed more like a punishment than a reward because it deprived me of opportunities to do what I most liked to do: solve complex technical problems.

    I was already at the top of the company’s technical ladder, and the only way to get a salary increase was to take the PL job.

    This was unfortunate, both for myself and the company. For myself, because I had little interest in being a manager, and for the company, because they had turned a top-notch programmer into a mediocre manager.

    That is why I got into consulting.

  2. Years ago, when I was promoted to Project Leader I thought it was a reward for being a very successful senior programmer/analyst.

    It didn’t take me long to realize that being a manager requires a vastly different set of skills than being a senior P/A. Moreover, the new job seemed more like a punishment than a reward because it deprived me of opportunities to do what I most liked to do: solve complex technical problems.

    I was already at the top of the company’s technical ladder, and the only way to get a salary increase was to take the PL job.

    This was unfortunate, both for myself and the company. For myself, because I had little interest in being a manager, and for the company, because they had turned a top-notch programmer into a mediocre manager.

    That is why I got into consulting.

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