The Eagle Blog

Trust is Fragile

Often in this blog I talk about business ideas, sales thoughts, staffing industry nuances etc. Every now and then there is a subject that crosses all boundaries and trust is one of them.

I found an interesting article on the web that talks about ten easy ways to lose your customer’s trust … and #5 was “Don’t Talk with your customer “ sounds like something I might blog about!

Trust is an integral part of any relationship whether it is personal or in business, whether it is between individuals or companies. The establishment of trust takes time and energy and yet it can be hurt or lost so quickly.

A good sales person will build trust with their clients and prospects by making promises and then delivering. The best way to do this is to start really small and DELIVER! For example, “I will get back to you with an answer by Wednesday” … if you do get back to the client on Wednesday, or before, then you start to establish credibility and build trust. I will send you some information right away, I will follow up in a month to make sure its working … all easy promises to keep, and easy ways to start to build trust. All are also easy ways to fall on your face! Miss the deadline, forget to follow up and your credibility is gone. If there is any “shakiness” in the relationship already then the client will be looking for you to fall on your face and it will just be another nail in the coffin of that relationship.

On Wednesday I blogged about a company that I have found to be supremely unimpressive. On Tuesday I phoned their CEO, a VP and another person leaving urgent voice mails. Not one of them phoned me back (the second time the CEO has chosen to ignore me). Late Tuesday night I had an email from the VP. On Wednesday, after blogging, I received a phone call from a different VP, and there was even a sign that he might be trying to build some credibility. He actually apologized (probably the first person from that company I can remember doing that in a year) and said he would also follow up by email so that I would have both ways to contact him. A good start … well, 24 hours later I still have no email. Guess how much trust and credibility exists!

I received an email from a friend today. His wife arrived home unexpectedly and found 3 of the gardeners swimming in her pool and the 4th sunning himself on a lounger. Guess how much trust and credibility they have!

As a parent I give my son a fair bit of leeway, but he has earned that trust. However it would also be easy for him to damage the trust if he were to do something foolish.

Trust is built over time and hurt in minutes. It also ties in to Covey’s emotional bank account concept, because if you have a good track record of building trust then a lapse can be forgiven. If you don’t have the “deposits” in the bank account then going overdrawn can be “game over”! Ask any divorce lawyer!


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8 thoughts on “Trust is Fragile

  1. Everyone knows it is sons that cause all the trouble … my daughter is a model of behaviour! Why would I ever worry!about my daughter?

    I knew blogging would get me in trouble sometime! Who thought she would read my blog? I hope my son doesn’t read it now!

  2. Everyone knows it is sons that cause all the trouble … my daughter is a model of behaviour! Why would I ever worry!about my daughter?

    I knew blogging would get me in trouble sometime! Who thought she would read my blog? I hope my son doesn’t read it now!

  3. Kevin,

    I agree with your comments entirely. Drilling down a little further, these are actions that should also be common within the workplace amongst employees. Managers need to be able to trust that their employees will continue to do their work autonomously while they are busy with their management activities and their workers also need to be able to trust that their management team has a vested interest in their success. These roles are a symbiotic relationship as neither side will acheive their full potential for success if one half isn’t holding up their end of the bargain. It is easy to understand how these deposits and withdrawls can have a significant impact on the workplace.
    Thanks for making this a recurring topic. It is definitely one that should be addressed often to keep it at the forefront of people’s minds.

  4. Kevin,

    I agree with your comments entirely. Drilling down a little further, these are actions that should also be common within the workplace amongst employees. Managers need to be able to trust that their employees will continue to do their work autonomously while they are busy with their management activities and their workers also need to be able to trust that their management team has a vested interest in their success. These roles are a symbiotic relationship as neither side will acheive their full potential for success if one half isn’t holding up their end of the bargain. It is easy to understand how these deposits and withdrawls can have a significant impact on the workplace.
    Thanks for making this a recurring topic. It is definitely one that should be addressed often to keep it at the forefront of people’s minds.

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